Commander Legends Kaldheim
106.3
Mana is produced by the effects of mana abilities (see rule 605). It may also be produced by the effects of spells, as well as by the effects of abilities that aren’t mana abilities. A spell or ability that produces mana instructs a player to add that mana.
106.3
Mana is produced by the effects of mana abilities (see rule 605). It may also be produced by the effects of spells, as well as by the effects of abilities that aren’t mana abilities. A spell or ability that produces mana instructs a player to add that mana. If mana is produced by a spell, the source of that mana is that spell. If mana is produced by an ability, the source of that mana is the source of that ability (see rule 113.7).
107.4
The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {C}; the numerical symbols {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the variable symbol {X}; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; the monocolored hybrid symbols {2/W}, {2/U}, {2/B}, {2/R}, and {2/G}; the Phyrexian mana symbols {W/P}, {U/P}, {B/P}, {R/P}, and {G/P}; and the snow symbol {S}.
107.4
The mana symbols are {W}, {U}, {B}, {R}, {G}, and {C}; the numerical symbols {0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, and so on; the variable symbol {X}; the hybrid symbols {W/U}, {W/B}, {U/B}, {U/R}, {B/R}, {B/G}, {R/G}, {R/W}, {G/W}, and {G/U}; the monocolored hybrid symbols {2/W}, {2/U}, {2/B}, {2/R}, and {2/G}; the Phyrexian mana symbols {W/P}, {U/P}, {B/P}, {R/P}, and {G/P}; and the snow mana symbol {S}.
107.4h
The snow mana symbol {S} represents one mana in a cost. This mana can be paid with one mana of any type produced by a snow permanent (see rule 205.4g). Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don’t affect {S} costs. Snow is neither a color nor a type of mana.
107.4h
When used in a cost, the snow mana symbol {S} represents a cost that can be paid with one mana of any type produced by a snow source (see rule 106.3). Effects that reduce the amount of generic mana you pay don’t affect {S} costs. The {S} symbol can also be used to refer to mana of any type produced by a snow source spent to pay a cost. Snow is neither a color nor a type of mana.
109.2c
If a spell or ability uses a description of an object that includes the word “source,” it means a source matching that description–either a source of an ability or a source of damage–in any zone. See rule 609.7.
109.2c
If a spell or ability uses a description of an object that includes the word “source,” it means a source matching that description–a source of an ability, of damage, or of mana–in any zone. See rules 113.7 and 609.7.
111.10d
A Walker token is a 2/2 black Zombie creature token named Walker.
111.10e
A Shard token is a colorless enchantment token with “{2}, Sacrifice this enchantment: Scry 1, then draw a card.”
113.11
Effects can stop an object from having a specified ability. These effects say that the object “can’t have” that ability. If the object has that ability, it loses it. It’s also impossible for an effect to add that ability to the object. If a resolving spell or ability creates a continuous effect that would add the specified ability to such an object, that part of that continuous effect does not apply; however, other parts of that continuous effect will still apply, and that resolving spell or ability can still create other continuous effects. Continuous effects created by static abilities that would add the specified ability won’t apply to that object.
113.11
Effects can stop an object from having a specified ability. These effects say that the object “can’t have” that ability. If the object has that ability, it loses it. It’s also impossible for an effect or keyword counter to add that ability to the object. If a resolving spell or ability creates a continuous effect that would add the specified ability to such an object, that part of that continuous effect does not apply; however, other parts of that continuous effect will still apply, and that resolving spell or ability can still create other continuous effects. Continuous effects created by static abilities that would add the specified ability won’t apply to that object.
116.2
There are nine special actions:
116.2
There are ten special actions:
116.2h
A player who has a card with foretell in their hand may pay {2} and exile that card face down. This is a special action. A player may take this action any time they have priority during their turn. See rule 702.142, “Foretell.”
119.4
If a cost or effect allows a player to pay an amount of life greater than 0, the player may do so only if their life total is greater than or equal to the amount of the payment. If a player pays life, the payment is subtracted from their life total; in other words, the player loses that much life. (Players can always pay 0 life.)
119.4
If a cost or effect allows a player to pay an amount of life greater than 0, the player may do so only if their life total is greater than or equal to the amount of the payment. If a player pays life, the payment is subtracted from their life total; in other words, the player loses that much life.
119.4a
If a cost or effect allows a player to pay an amount of life greater than 0 in a Two–Headed Giant game, the player may do so only if their team’s life total is greater than or equal to the total amount of life both team members are paying for that cost or effect. If a player pays life, the payment is subtracted from their team’s life total. (Players can always pay 0 life.)
119.4a
If a cost or effect allows a player to pay an amount of life greater than 0 in a Two–Headed Giant game, the player may do so only if their team’s life total is greater than or equal to the total amount of life both team members are paying for that cost or effect. If a player pays life, the payment is subtracted from their team’s life total.
119.4b
Players can always pay 0 life, no matter what their (or their team’s) life total is, and even if an effect says players can’t pay life.
120.4a
First, if an effect is causing damage to be dealt to a creature and that effect specifies that excess damage is dealt to another object or player instead, the damage event is modified to deal damage accordingly. Excess damage is damage greater than lethal damage that would be dealt to a creature. Lethal damage is the creature’s toughness minus damage marked on that creature and other damage being dealt to it at the same time as this damage. Any damage greater than 1 is excess damage if the source dealing that damage has deathtouch.
120.4a
First, if an effect that’s causing damage to be dealt states that excess damage that would be dealt to a permanent is dealt to another permanent or player instead, the damage event is modified accordingly. If the first permanent is a creature, the excess damage is the amount of damage in excess of what would be lethal damage, taking into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other sources that would be dealt at the same time. (See rule 120.6.) If the first permanent is a planeswalker, the excess damage is the amount of damage in excess of that planeswalker’s loyalty, taking into account damage from other sources that would be dealt at the same time. If the first permanent is both a creature and a planeswalker, the excess damage is the greater of those two amounts.
120.10
Some triggered abilities check whether a permanent has been dealt excess damage. These abilities check after the permanent has been dealt damage by one or more sources. If those sources together dealt an amount of damage to a creature greater than lethal damage, excess damage equal to the difference was dealt to that creature. If those sources together dealt an amount of damage to a planeswalker greater than that planeswalker’s loyalty before the damage was dealt, excess damage equal to the difference was dealt to that planeswalker. If a permanent is both a creature and a planeswalker, the excess damage dealt to that permanent is the greater of those two amounts.
122.8
If a triggered ability instructs a player to “put those counters” or to “put [an object’s] counters” on another object and that ability’s trigger condition or effect checks that the object with those counters left the battlefield, that player puts a number of counters on the second object of each kind the first object had before it left the battlefield. The player doesn’t move counters from one object to another.
122.8
If a triggered ability instructs a player to put one object’s counters on another object and that ability’s trigger condition or effect checks that the object with those counters left the battlefield, the player doesn’t move counters from one object to the other. Rather, the player puts the same number of each kind of counter the first object had onto the second object.
201.2a
Two objects have the same name if their names are identical. An object with no name doesn’t have the same name as any other object, including another object with no name.
201.2a
Two or more objects have the same name if they have at least one name in common, even if one or more of those objects have additional names. An object with no name doesn’t have the same name as any other object, including another object with no name.
201.2c
Two or more objects have different names only if each of them has at least one name and no two objects in that group have the same name.
201.2b
Some spells and abilities refer to two or more objects with different names. Those objects have different names only if each of them has at least one name and no two objects in that group have a name in common.
201.2c
Some spells or abilities check if one object has a different name than a second object or group of objects. The first object has a different name than those objects if the first object has at least one name and has no names in common with any of the other objects, even if one or more of the other objects have no names. If the first object has no name, it does not have a different name than any of the other objects, even if those other objects themselves have names.
201.4a
If an ability’s effect grants another ability to an object, and that second ability refers to that first ability’s source by name, the name refers only to the specific object that is that first ability’s source, not to any other object with the same name. This is also true if the second ability is copied onto a new object.
201.4a
If an ability’s effect grants another ability to an object, and that second ability refers to that first ability’s source by name, the name refers only to the specific object which is that first ability’s source. The second ability does not refer to any other object with the same name as the first ability’s source. However, if the second ability also moved the first ability’s source to a different public zone, the name refers to the object the source became in its new zone. This is also true if the second ability is copied onto a new object.
205.3h
Enchantments have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called enchantment types.
No enchantment types were removed in this update.
205.3h
Enchantments have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called enchantment types.
The new enchantment types this set are: Rune, Shard
(Click the rule number to see the full list of enchantment types.)
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
No planeswalker types were removed in this update.
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
The new planeswalker types this set are: Jeska, Niko, Szat, Tyvar
(Click the rule number to see the full list of planeswalker types.)
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
No creature types were removed in this update.
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
The new creature types this set are: Phyrexian
(Click the rule number to see the full list of creature types.)
205.4a
A card can also have one or more supertypes. These are printed directly before its card types. The supertypes are basic, legendary, ongoing, snow, and world.
205.4a
An object can have one or more supertypes. A card’s supertypes are printed directly before its card types. The supertypes are basic, legendary, ongoing, snow, and world.
406.3
Exiled cards are, by default, kept face up and may be examined by any player at any time. Cards “exiled face down” can’t be examined by any player except when instructions allow it. However, once a player is allowed to look at a card exiled face down, that player may continue to look at that card as long as it remains exiled, even if the instruction allowing the player to do so no longer applies. A card exiled face down has no characteristics, but the spell or ability that exiled it may allow it to be played from exile. Unless that card is being cast face down (see rule 707.4), the card is turned face up just before the player announces that they are playing the card (see rule 601.2).
406.3
Exiled cards are, by default, kept face up and may be examined by any player at any time. Cards “exiled face down” can’t be examined by any player except when instructions allow it. However, once a player is allowed to look at a card exiled face down, that player may continue to look at that card as long as it remains exiled, even if the instruction allowing the player to do so no longer applies.
406.3a
A card exiled face down has no characteristics, but the spell or ability that exiled it may allow it to be played from exile. Unless that card is being cast face down (see rule 707.4), the card is turned face up just before the player announces that they are playing the card (see rule 601.2).
406.3b
Some spells and abilities allow a player to cast spells with certain qualities from among face–down cards in exile. A player may cast such a spell only if they are allowed to look at the face–down card in exile and if the resulting spell has the specified qualities.
601.2a
To propose the casting of a spell, a player first moves that card (or that copy of a card) from where it is to the stack. It becomes the topmost object on the stack. It has all the characteristics of the card (or the copy of a card) associated with it, and that player becomes its controller. The spell remains on the stack until it’s countered, it resolves, or an effect moves it elsewhere.
601.2a
To propose the casting of a spell, a player first moves that card (or that copy of a card) from where it is to the stack. It becomes the topmost object on the stack. It has all the characteristics of the card (or the copy of a card) associated with it, and that player becomes its controller. The spell remains on the stack until it resolves, it’s countered, or a rule or effect moves it elsewhere.
601.3f
Some effects allow a player to cast a spell with certain qualities from among face–down cards in exile. A player may begin to cast such a spell only if they can look at the face–down card in exile.
607.1d
An ability printed on an emblem is considered to be “printed on” the planeswalker that was the source of the ability that created that emblem for these purposes.
607.2p
Any of the above rules can apply to a planeswalker and an emblem with a pair of linked abilities even though the planeswalker and emblem are different objects.
608.3
If the object that’s resolving is a permanent spell, its resolution involves a single step (unless it’s an Aura or a mutating creature spell). The spell card becomes a permanent and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller.
608.3
If the object that’s resolving is a permanent spell, its resolution involves a single step (unless it’s an Aura, a copy of a permanent spell, or a mutating creature spell). The spell card becomes a permanent and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller.
608.3c
If the object that’s resolving is a mutating creature spell, its resolution involves two steps. First, it checks whether the target creature with the same owner as the spell is still legal. If so, the spell card merges with that permanent. Otherwise, it becomes a creature spell and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller. (See rule 702.139, “Mutate.”)
608.3c
If the object that’s resolving is a mutating creature spell, its resolution involves two steps. First, it checks whether the target creature with the same owner as the spell is still legal. If so, the object representing that spell merges with that permanent. Otherwise, it becomes a creature spell and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller. (See rule 702.139, “Mutate.”)
701.12b
If a creature instructed to fight is no longer on the battlefield or is no longer a creature, no damage is dealt. If a creature is an illegal target for a resolving spell or ability that instructs it to fight, no damage is dealt.
701.12b
If one or both creatures instructed to fight are no longer on the battlefield or are no longer creatures, neither of them fights or deals damage. If one or both creatures are illegal targets for a resolving spell or ability that instructs them to fight, neither of them fights or deals damage.
702.16p
One Aura (Benevolent Blessing) gives the enchanted creature protection from a quality and says the effect doesn’t remove certain permanents that are “already attached to” that creature. This means that any object with the stated quality attached to that creature at the moment the protection effect starts to apply (including the Aura giving the permanent protection) aren’t put into their owners’ graveyards as a state–based action. Other permanents with the stated quality can’t become attached to the creature. If the creature has other instances of protection from the same quality, those instances affect attached permanents as normal.
702.16p
One Aura (Benevolent Blessing) gives the enchanted creature protection from a quality and says the effect doesn’t remove certain permanents that are “already attached to” that creature. This means that, when the protection effect starts to apply, any objects with the stated quality that are already attached to that creature (including the Aura giving that creature protection) will not be put into their owners’ graveyards as a state–based action. Other permanents with the stated quality can’t become attached to the creature. If the creature has other instances of protection from the same quality, those instances affect attached permanents as normal.
702.33a
Flashback appears on some instants and sorceries. It represents two static abilities: one that functions while the card is in a player’s graveyard and another that functions while the card is on the stack. “Flashback [cost]” means “You may cast this card from your graveyard by paying [cost] rather than paying its mana cost” and “If the flashback cost was paid, exile this card instead of putting it anywhere else any time it would leave the stack.” Casting a spell using its flashback ability follows the rules for paying alternative costs in rules 601.2b and 601.2f–h.
702.33a
Flashback appears on some instants and sorceries. It represents two static abilities: one that functions while the card is in a player’s graveyard and another that functions while the card is on the stack. “Flashback [cost]” means “You may cast this card from your graveyard if the resulting spell is an instant or sorcery spell by paying [cost] rather than paying its mana cost” and “If the flashback cost was paid, exile this card instead of putting it anywhere else any time it would leave the stack.” Casting a spell using its flashback ability follows the rules for paying alternative costs in rules 601.2b and 601.2f–h.
702.132a
Jump–start appears on some instants and sorceries. It represents two static abilities: one that functions while the card is in a player’s graveyard and another that functions while the card is on the stack. “Jump–start” means “You may cast this card from your graveyard by discarding a card as an additional cost to cast it” and “If this spell was cast using its jump–start ability, exile this card instead of putting it anywhere else any time it would leave the stack.” Casting a spell using its jump–start ability follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 601.2b and 601.2f–h.
702.132a
Jump–start appears on some instants and sorceries. It represents two static abilities: one that functions while the card is in a player’s graveyard and another that functions while the card is on the stack. “Jump–start” means “You may cast this card from your graveyard if the resulting spell is an instant or sorcery spell by discarding a card as an additional cost to cast it” and “If this spell was cast using its jump–start ability, exile this card instead of putting it anywhere else any time it would leave the stack.” Casting a spell using its jump–start ability follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 601.2b and 601.2f–h.
702.141a
A boast ability is a special kind of activated ability. “Boast — [Cost]: [Effect]” means “[Cost]: [Effect]. Activate this ability only if this creature attacked this turn and only once each turn.”
702.141b
Effects may refer to boast abilities. If an effect refers to a creature boasting, it means its boast ability being activated.
702.142a
Foretell is a keyword that functions while the card with foretell is in a player’s hand. Any time a player has priority during their turn, that player may pay {2} and exile a card with foretell from their hand face down. That player may look at that card as long as it remains in exile. They may cast that card after the current turn has ended by paying any foretell cost it has rather than paying that spell’s mana cost. Casting a spell this way follows the rules for paying alternative costs in rules 601.2b and 601.2f–h.
702.142b
Exiling a card using its foretell ability is a special action, which doesn’t use the stack. See rule 116, “Special Actions.”
702.142c
If an effect refers to foretelling a card, it means performing the special action associated with a foretell ability. If an effect refers to a card or spell that was foretold, it means a card put in the exile zone as a result of the special action associated with a foretell ability, or a spell that was a foretold card before it was cast, even if it was cast for a cost other than a foretell cost.
702.142d
If an effect states that a card in exile becomes foretold, that card becomes a foretold card. That effect may give the card a foretell cost. That card may be cast for any foretell cost it has after the turn it became a foretold card has ended, even if the resulting spell doesn’t have foretell.
702.142e
If a player owns multiple foretold cards in exile, they must ensure that those cards can be easily differentiated from each other and from any other face–down cards in exile which that player owns. This includes knowing both the order in which those cards were put into exile and any foretell costs other than their printed foretell costs those cards may have.
702.142f
If a player leaves the game, all face–down foretold cards that player owns must be revealed to all players. At the end of each game, all face–down foretold cards must be revealed to all players.
704.6d
In a Commander game, if a commander is in a graveyard or in exile and that card was put into that zone since the last time state–based actions were checked, its owner may put it into the command zone. See rule 903, “Commander.”
704.6d
In a Commander game, if a commander is in a graveyard or in exile and that object was put into that zone since the last time state–based actions were checked, its owner may put it into the command zone. See rule 903, “Commander.”
706.9c
Some copy effects modify a characteristic as part of the copying process. The final value(s) for that characteristic becomes part of the copiable values for the copy.
706.9b
Some copy effects modify a characteristic as part of the copying process. The final set of values for that characteristic becomes part of the copiable values of the copy.
706.9b
Some copy effects specifically state that they don’t copy certain characteristics and instead retain their original values. They may also simply state that certain characteristics are not copied.
706.9c
Some copy effects specifically state that they don’t copy certain characteristics and the affected objects instead retain their original values. Copy effects may also simply state that certain characteristics are not copied.
706.9d
When applying a copy effect that doesn’t copy a certain characteristic, retains an original value for a certain characteristic, or modifies the final value of a certain characteristic, any characteristic–defining ability (see rule 604.3) of the object being copied that defines that characteristic is not copied. If that characteristic is color, any color indicator (see rule 204) of that object is also not copied.
706.9d
When applying a copy effect that doesn’t copy a certain characteristic, retains one or more original values for a certain characteristic, or provides a specific set of values for a certain characteristic, any characteristic–defining ability (see rule 604.3) of the object being copied that defines that characteristic is not copied. If that characteristic is color, any color indicator (see rule 204) of that object is also not copied. This rule does not apply to copy effects with exceptions that state the object is a certain card type, supertype, and/or subtype “in addition to its other types.” In those cases, any characteristic–defining ability that defines card type, supertype, and/or subtype is copied.
706.9f
Some exceptions to the copying process apply only if the copy is or has certain characteristics. To determine whether such an exception applies, consider what the resulting permanent’s characteristics would be if the copy effect were applied without that exception, taking into account any other exceptions that effect includes.
716.2
One card (Word of Command) allows a player to control another player for a limited duration.
716.2
Two cards (Word of Command and Opposition Agent) allow a player to control another player for a limited duration.
721.2
To merge an object with a permanent, place that object on top of or under that permanent. That permanent becomes a merged permanent represented by the card that represented that object in addition to any other components that were representing it.
721.2
To merge an object with a permanent, place that object on top of or under that permanent. That permanent becomes a merged permanent represented by the card or copy that represented that object in addition to any other components that were representing it.
903.9a
If a commander is in a graveyard or in exile and that card was put into that zone since the last time state–based actions were checked, its owner may put it into the command zone. This is a state–based action. See rule 704.
903.9a
If a commander is in a graveyard or in exile and that object was put into that zone since the last time state–based actions were checked, its owner may put it into the command zone. This is a state–based action. See rule 704.