Modern Horizons 2 Adventures in the Forgotten Realms
100.3
Some casual variants require additional items, such as specially designated cards, nontraditional Magic cards, and dice. See section 9, “Casual Variants.”
100.3
Some cards require coins or traditional dice. Some casual variants require additional items, such as specially designated cards, nontraditional Magic cards, and specialized dice.
107.16
The text box of a Class card contains class level bars, each of which is a keyword ability that represents both an activated ability and a static ability. A class level bar includes the activation cost of its activated ability and a level number. Any abilities printed within the same text box section as the class level bar are part of its static ability. See rule 717, “Class Cards.”
107.16a
“[Cost]: Level N — [Abilities]” means “[Cost]: This Class’s level becomes N. Activate this ability only if this Class is level N–1 and only as a sorcery” and “As long as this Class is level N or greater, it has [abilities].”
108.2a
Most Magic games use only traditional Magic cards, which measure approximately 2.5 inches (6.3 cm) by 3.5 inches (8.8 cm). Certain formats also use nontraditional Magic cards, oversized cards that may have different backs.
108.2a
Most Magic games use only traditional Magic cards, which measure approximately 2.5 inches (6.3 cm) by 3.5 inches (8.8 cm). Traditional Magic cards are included in players’ decks. Certain formats also use nontraditional Magic cards. Nontraditional Magic cards are not included in players’ decks. They may be used in supplementary decks. Additionally, they may be oversized, have different card backs, or both.
108.5
Nontraditional Magic cards can’t start the game in any zone other than the command zone (see rule 408). If an effect would bring a nontraditional Magic card into the game from outside the game, it doesn’t; that card remains outside the game.
108.5
Nontraditional Magic cards can’t start the game in any zone other than the command zone (see rule 408). If an effect would bring a nontraditional Magic card other than a dungeon card (see rule 309, “Dungeons”) into the game from outside the game, it doesn’t; that card remains outside the game.
111.10e
A Shard token is a colorless enchantment token with “{2}, Sacrifice this enchantment: Scry 1, then draw a card.”
111.10e
A Shard token is a colorless Shard enchantment token with “{2}, Sacrifice this enchantment: Scry 1, then draw a card.”
205.2a
The card types are artifact, conspiracy, creature, enchantment, instant, land, phenomenon, plane, planeswalker, scheme, sorcery, tribal, and vanguard. See section 3, “Card Types.”
205.2a
The card types are artifact, conspiracy, creature, dungeon, enchantment, instant, land, phenomenon, plane, planeswalker, scheme, sorcery, tribal, and vanguard. See section 3, “Card Types.”
205.3h
Enchantments have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called enchantment types.
No enchantment types were removed in this update.
205.3h
Enchantments have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called enchantment types.
The new enchantment types this set are: Class (see rule 717)
(Click the rule number to see the full list of enchantment types.)
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
No planeswalker types were removed in this update.
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
The new planeswalker types this set are: Bahamut, Ellywick, Lolth, Mordenkainen, Zariel
(Click the rule number to see the full list of planeswalker types.)
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
No creature types were removed in this update.
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
The new creature types this set are: Bard, Beholder, Gnoll, Halfling, Hamster, Tiefling
(Click the rule number to see the full list of creature types.)
205.3p
Phenomenon cards, scheme cards, vanguard cards, and conspiracy cards have no subtypes.
205.3p
Dungeon cards, phenomenon cards, scheme cards, vanguard cards, and conspiracy cards have no subtypes.
207.2b
Flavor text is italicized text that, like the illustration, adds artistic appeal to the game. It appears below the rules text.
207.2b
Flavor text is italicized text that, like the illustration, adds artistic appeal to the game. It usually appears below the rules text.
207.2c
An ability word appears in italics at the beginning of some abilities. Ability words are similar to keywords in that they tie together cards that have similar functionality, but they have no special rules meaning and no individual entries in the Comprehensive Rules.
No ability words were removed in this update.
207.2c
An ability word appears in italics at the beginning of some abilities. Ability words are similar to keywords in that they tie together cards that have similar functionality, but they have no special rules meaning and no individual entries in the Comprehensive Rules.
The new ability words this set are: pack tactics
(Click the rule number to see the full list of ability words.)
207.2d
Similar to ability words, flavor words appear in italics at the beginning of some abilities. Flavor words provide a flavorful description of abilities, but they have no special rules meaning and are not listed in the Comprehensive Rules. While an ability word ties together several abilities with similar functionality, each flavor word is tailored to the specific ability it appears with.
207.4
The chaos symbol {CHAOS} appears in the text box of each plane card to the left of a triggered ability that triggers whenever {CHAOS} is rolled on the planar die. The symbol itself has no special rules meaning.
207.4
The chaos symbol {CHAOS} appears in the text box of each plane card to the left of a triggered ability that triggers whenever {CHAOS} is rolled on the planar die. The symbol itself has no special rules meaning. See rule 901, “Planechase.”
301.5b
An Equipment is cast and enters the battlefield just like any other artifact. An Equipment doesn’t enter the battlefield attached to a creature. The equip keyword ability attaches the Equipment to a creature you control (see rule 702.6, “Equip”). Control of the creature matters only when the equip ability is activated and when it resolves. Spells and other abilities may also attach an Equipment to a creature. If an effect attempts to attach an Equipment to an object that can’t be equipped by it, the Equipment doesn’t move.
301.5b
Equipment spells are cast like other artifact spells. Equipment enter the battlefield like other artifacts. They don’t enter the battlefield attached to a creature. The equip keyword ability attaches the Equipment to a creature you control (see rule 702.6, “Equip”). Control of the creature matters only when the equip ability is activated and when it resolves. Spells and other abilities may also attach an Equipment to a creature. If an effect attempts to attach an Equipment to an object that can’t be equipped by it, the Equipment doesn’t move.
303.6
Some enchantments have the subtype “Class.” See rule 717 for more information about Class cards.
309.1
Dungeon is a card type seen only on nontraditional Magic cards.
309.2
Dungeon cards begin outside the game. Dungeon cards aren’t part of a player’s deck or sideboard. They are brought into the game using the venture into the dungeon keyword action. See rule 701.46, “Venture into the Dungeon.”
309.2a
If a player ventures into the dungeon while they don’t own a dungeon card in the command zone, they choose a dungeon card they own from outside the game and put it into the command zone.
309.2b
A dungeon card that’s brought into the game is put into the command zone until it leaves the game.
309.2c
Dungeon cards are not permanents. They can’t be cast. Dungeon cards can’t leave the command zone except as they leave the game.
309.2d
If an effect other than the venture into the dungeon keyword action would bring a dungeon card into the game from outside the game, it doesn’t; that card remains outside the game.
309.3
A player can own only one dungeon card in the command zone at a time, and they can’t bring a dungeon card into the game if a dungeon card they own is in the command zone.
309.4
Each dungeon card has a series of rooms connected to one another with arrows. A player uses a venture marker placed on the dungeon card they own to indicate which room they are currently in.
309.4a
As a player puts a dungeon they own into the command zone, they put their venture marker on the topmost room.
309.4b
Each room has a name. These names are considered flavor text and do not affect game play.
309.4c
Each room has a triggered ability called a room ability whose effect is printed on the card. They all have the same trigger condition not printed on the card. The full text of each room ability is “When you move your venture marker into this room, [effect.]” As long as a dungeon card is in the command zone, its abilities may trigger. Each room ability is controlled by the player who owns the dungeon card that is that ability’s source.
309.5
The venture into the dungeon keyword action allows players to move their venture marker down the rooms of a dungeon card.
309.5a
If a player ventures into the dungeon while they own a dungeon card in the command zone and their venture marker isn’t on that dungeon’s bottommost room, they move their venture marker from the room it is in to the next room, following the direction of an arrow pointing away from the room their venture marker is in. If there are multiple arrows pointing away from the room the player’s venture marker is in, they choose one of them to follow.
309.5b
If a player ventures into the dungeon while they own a dungeon card in the command zone and their venture marker is on that dungeon card’s bottommost room, they remove that dungeon card from the game. They then choose a dungeon card they own from outside the game and put it into the command zone. They put their venture marker on the topmost room.
309.6
If a player’s venture marker is on the bottommost room of a dungeon card, and that dungeon card isn’t the source of a room ability that has triggered but not yet left the stack, the dungeon card’s owner removes it from the game. (This is a state–based action. See rule 704.)
309.7
A player completes a dungeon as that dungeon card is removed from the game.
312.5
The owner of a vanguard card is the player who started the game with it in the command zone. The controller of a face–up vanguard card is its owner.
313.5
The owner of a scheme card is the player who started the game with it in the command zone. The controller of a face–up scheme card is its owner.
313.6
If a non–ongoing scheme card is face up in the command zone, and no triggered abilities of any scheme are on the stack or waiting to be put on the stack, that scheme card is turned face down and put on the bottom of its owner’s scheme deck the next time a player would receive priority. (This is a state–based action. See rule 704.)
314.6
The owner of a conspiracy card is the player who put it into the command zone at the start of the game. The controller of a conspiracy card is its owner.
400.11b
Some effects bring cards into a game from outside of it. Those cards remain in the game until it ends or their owner leaves the game, whichever comes first.
400.11b
Some effects bring cards into a game from outside the game. Those cards remain in the game until the game ends, their owner leaves the game, or a rule or effect removes them from the game, whichever comes first.
601.2h
The player pays the total cost in any order. Partial payments are not allowed. Unpayable costs can’t be paid.
601.2h
The player pays the total cost. First, they pay all costs that do not involve random elements or moving objects from hidden zones to public zones in any order. Then they pay all remaining costs in any order. Partial payments are not allowed. Unpayable costs can’t be paid.
603.2e
Some effects refer to a triggered ability of an object. Such effects refer only to triggered abilities the object has, not any delayed triggered abilities (see rule 603.7) that may be created by abilities the object has.
603.12
A replacement effect or a resolving spell or ability may allow or instruct a player to take an action and create a triggered ability that triggers “when [a player] [does or doesn’t]” take that action or “when [something happens] this way.” These reflexive triggered abilities follow the rules for delayed triggered abilities (see rule 603.7), except that they’re checked immediately after being created and trigger based on whether the trigger event or events occurred earlier during the resolution of the spell or ability that created them. If the trigger event or events occur multiple times during that time, the reflexive triggered ability will trigger once for each of those times.
603.12
A resolving spell or ability may allow or instruct a player to take an action and create a triggered ability that triggers “when [a player] [does or doesn’t]” take that action or “when [something happens] this way.” These reflexive triggered abilities follow the rules for delayed triggered abilities (see rule 603.7), except that they’re checked immediately after being created and trigger based on whether the trigger event or events occurred earlier during the resolution of the spell or ability that created them. If the trigger event or events occur multiple times during that time, the reflexive triggered ability will trigger once for each of those times.
700.7
If an ability of an object uses a phrase such as “this [something]” to identify an object, where [something] is a characteristic, it is referring to that particular object, even if it isn’t the appropriate characteristic at the time.
700.7
If an ability uses a phrase such as “this [something]” to identify an object, where [something] is a characteristic, it is referring to that particular object, even if it isn’t the appropriate characteristic at the time.
701.38a
Certain spells and abilities can goad a creature. Until the next turn of the controller of that spell or ability, that creature attacks each combat if able and attacks a player other than that player if able.
701.38a
Certain spells and abilities can goad a creature. Until the next turn of the controller of that spell or ability, that creature is goaded.
701.38b
A static ability may state that a creature “is goaded.” That creature attacks each combat if able and attacks a player other than the controller of the permanent with that static ability if able.
701.38b
Goaded is a designation a permanent can have. A goaded creature attacks each combat if able and attacks a player other than the controller of the permanent, spell, or ability that caused it to be goaded if able. Goaded is neither an ability nor part of the permanent’s copiable values.
701.38c
A creature can be goaded by multiple players. Doing so creates additional combat requirements.
701.38c
Once a player has goaded a creature, the same player goading it again has no effect. It doesn’t create additional combat requirements.
701.38d
Once a player has goaded a creature, the same player goading it again has no effect. Doing so doesn’t create additional combat requirements.
701.46a
If a player is instructed to venture into the dungeon while they don’t own a dungeon card in the command zone, they choose a dungeon card they own from outside the game and put it into the command zone. They put their venture marker on the topmost room. See rule 309, “Dungeons.”
701.46b
If a player is instructed to venture into the dungeon while their venture marker is in any room except the dungeon card’s bottommost room, they choose an adjacent room, following the direction of an arrow pointing away from their current room. If there are multiple arrows pointing away from the room the player’s venture marker is in, they choose one of them to follow. They move their venture marker to that adjacent room.
701.46c
If a player is instructed to venture into the dungeon while their venture marker is in the bottommost room of a dungeon card, they remove that dungeon card from the game. Doing so causes the player to complete that dungeon (see rule 309.7). They then complete the procedure outlined in rule 701.46a again.
702.15c
If a permanent leaves the battlefield before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had lifelink.
702.15c
If an object changes zones before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had lifelink.
702.80b
If a permanent leaves the battlefield before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had wither.
702.80b
If an object changes zones before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had wither.
702.87c
Some enchantments have the subtype Class and associated abilities that give them a class level. These are not the same as level up abilities and class levels do not interact with level counters. See rule 717, “Class Cards.”
702.90d
If a permanent leaves the battlefield before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had infect.
702.90d
If an object changes zones before an effect causes it to deal damage, its last known information is used to determine whether it had infect.
704.5t
If a player’s venture marker is on the bottommost room of a dungeon card, and that dungeon card isn’t the source of a room ability that has triggered but not yet left the stack, the dungeon card’s owner removes it from the game. See rule 309, “Dungeons.”
706.1
An effect that instructs a player to roll a die will specify what kind of die to roll and how many of those dice to roll.
706.1a
Such an effect may refer to an “N–sided die,” “N–sided dice,” or one or more “dN,” where N is a positive integer. In all cases, the die must have N equally–likely outcomes, numbered from 1 to N. For example, a d20 is a twenty–sided die with possible outcomes from 1 to 20.
706.1b
Players may agree to use an alternate method for rolling a die, including a digital substitute, as long as the method used has the same number of equally–likely outcomes as the die specified in the instruction.
706.2
After the roll, the number indicated on the top face of the die before any modifiers is the natural result. The instruction may include modifiers to the roll which add to or subtract from the natural result. Modifiers may also come from other sources. After considering all applicable modifiers, the final number is the result of the die roll.
706.3
Some abilities that instruct a player to roll one or more dice include a results table.
706.3a
The results table appears as a chart with multiple striations. Each striation includes possible results and an effect associated with those results. The possible results indicated could be a single number, a range of numbers with two endpoints in the form “N1–N2,” or a range with a single endpoint in the form “N+.” Each striation of the results chart means “If the result was in this range, [effect].” After a die roll, use the result to determine which effect listed on the results table happens.
706.3b
An instruction to roll one or more dice, any instructions to modify that roll printed in the same paragraph, any additional instructions based on the result of the roll, and the associated results table are all part of one ability.
706.3c
Some effects in results charts include the text “Roll again.” This additional roll uses the same kind of and number of dice originally called for, including any applicable modifiers.
706.4
Some abilities that instruct a player to roll one or more dice do not include a results table. The text of those abilities will indicate how to use the results of the die rolls.
706.5
If a player is instructed to roll two or more dice and ignore the lowest roll, the roll that yielded the lowest result is considered to have never happened. No abilities trigger because of the ignored roll, and no effects apply to that roll. If multiple results are tied for the lowest, the player chooses one of those rolls to be ignored.
706.6
In a Planechase game, rolling the planar die will cause any ability that triggers whenever a player rolls one or more dice to trigger. However, any effect that refers to a numerical result of a die roll, including ones that compare the results of that roll to other rolls or to a given number, ignores the rolling of the planar die. See rule 901, “Planechase.”
711.7
Some enchantments have the subtype Class and associated abilities that give them a class level. These are not level up abilities and class levels do not interact with level counters. See rule 717, “Class Cards.”
717.1
Each Class card has a striated text box containing two class level bars. Its illustration is vertically oriented on the left side of the card, and its type line is along the bottom of the card.
717.2
A class level bar is a keyword ability that represents both an activated ability and a static ability. A class level bar includes the activation cost of its activated ability and a level number. Any abilities printed within the same text box section as the class level bar are part of its static ability.
717.2a
“[Cost]: Level N — [Abilities]” means “[Cost]: This Class’s level becomes N. Activate this ability only if this Class is level N–1 and only as a sorcery” and “As long as this Class is level N or greater, it has [abilities].”
717.2b
A level is a designation that any permanent can have. A Class retains its level even if it stops being a Class. Levels are not a copiable characteristic.
717.2c
The phrase “to gain a Class level” means “to activate an ability indicated by a class level bar”
717.2d
If a rule or effect refers to a permanent’s level and that permanent doesn’t have a level, it is treated as though its level is 1.
717.3
Any ability printed on a Class card that isn’t preceded by a class level bar is treated normally. In particular, the Class has the ability printed in its top text box section at all times. That ability may affect the game if it’s a static ability, it may trigger if it’s a triggered ability, and it can be activated if it’s an activated ability.
717.4
Some older creature cards, called leveler cards, have level up abilities that add level counters to them. These are not the same as class level abilities. Level counters do not interact with Class cards, and class levels do not interact with leveler cards. See rule 702.87, “Level Up,” and rule 711, “Leveler Cards.”
719.1a
If there are any triggered abilities that triggered before this process began but haven’t been put onto the stack yet, those abilities cease to exist. They won’t be put onto the stack. This rule does not apply to abilities that trigger during this process (see rule 719.1f).
719.1b
Exile every object on the stack, including the object that’s resolving. All objects not on the battlefield or in the command zone that aren’t represented by cards will cease to exist the next time state–based actions are checked (see rule 704, “State–Based Actions”).
719.1c
Check state–based actions. No player gets priority, and no triggered abilities are put onto the stack.
901.9d
Rolling the planar die will cause any ability that triggers whenever a player rolls one or more dice to trigger. However, any effect that refers to a numerical result of a die roll, including ones that compare the results of that roll to other rolls or to a given number, ignores the rolling of the planar die. See 706, “Rolling a Die.”
903.11
If a player is allowed to bring a card from outside the game into a Commander game, that player can’t bring a card into the game this way if it has the same name as a card that player had in their starting deck, if it has the same name as a card that the player has already brought into the game, or if any color in its color identity isn’t in the color identity of the player’s commander.
903.11
If a player is allowed to bring a card from outside the game into a Commander game, that player can’t bring a card into the game this way if it has the same name as a card that player had in their starting deck, if it has the same name as a card that the player owns in the current game, or if any color in its color identity isn’t in the color identity of the player’s commander.