Theros Beyond Death Ikoria
100.2a
In constructed play (a way of playing in which each player creates their own deck ahead of time), each deck must contain at least sixty cards. A constructed deck may contain any number of basic land cards and no more than four of any card with a particular English name other than basic land cards.
100.2a
In constructed play (a way of playing in which each player creates their own deck ahead of time), each deck has a minimum deck size of 60 cards. A constructed deck may contain any number of basic land cards and no more than four of any card with a particular English name other than basic land cards.
100.2b
In limited play (a way of playing in which each player gets the same quantity of unopened Magic product such as booster packs and creates their own deck using only this product and basic land cards), each deck must contain at least forty cards. A limited deck may contain as many duplicates of a card as are included with the product.
100.2b
In limited play (a way of playing in which each player gets the same quantity of unopened Magic product such as booster packs and creates their own deck using only this product and basic land cards), each deck has a minimum deck size of 40 cards. A limited deck may contain as many duplicates of a card as are included with the product.
100.2c
Commander decks are subject to additional deckbuilding restrictions and requirements. See rule 903, “Commander,” for details.
100.5
There is no maximum deck size.
100.5
If a deck must contain at least a certain number of cards, that number is referred to as a minimum deck size. There is no maximum deck size for non–Commander decks.
103.1b
If a player wishes to reveal a card with a companion ability that they own from outside the game, they may do so after setting aside their sideboard. A player may reveal no more than one card this way, and may do so only if their deck fulfills the condition of that card’s companion ability. (See rule 702.138, “Companion.”)
103.1b
In a Commander game, each player puts their commander from their deck face up into the command zone before shuffling. See rule 903.6.
103.1c
In a Commander game, each player puts their commander from their deck face up into the command zone after having the opportunity to reveal a card with a companion ability and before shuffling. See rule 903.6.
115.1b
Aura spells are always targeted. These are the only permanent spells with targets. An Aura’s target is specified by its enchant keyword ability (see rule 702.5, “Enchant”). The target(s) are chosen as the spell is cast; see rule 601.2c. An Aura permanent doesn’t target anything; only the spell is targeted. (An activated or triggered ability of an Aura permanent can also be targeted.)
115.1b
Aura spells are always targeted. An Aura’s target is specified by its enchant keyword ability (see rule 702.5, “Enchant”). The target is chosen as the spell is cast; see rule 601.2c. An Aura permanent doesn’t target anything; only the spell is targeted. (An activated or triggered ability of an Aura permanent can also be targeted.)
115.1e
Some keyword abilities, such as equip and provoke, represent targeted activated or triggered abilities. In those cases, the phrase “target [something]” appears in the rule for that keyword ability rather than in the ability itself. (The keyword’s reminder text will often contain the word “target.”) See rule 702, “Keyword Abilities.”
115.1e
Some keyword abilities, such as equip and modular, represent targeted activated or triggered abilities, and some keyword abilities, such as mutate, cause spells to have targets. In those cases, the phrase “target [something]” appears in the rule for that keyword ability rather than in the ability itself. (The keyword’s reminder text will often contain the word “target.”) See rule 702, “Keyword Abilities.”
120.4
Damage is processed in a three–part sequence.
120.4
Damage is processed in a four–part sequence.
120.4a
First, if an effect is causing damage to be dealt to a creature and that effect specifies that excess damage is dealt to another object or player instead, the damage event is modified to deal damage accordingly. Excess damage is damage greater than the creature’s toughness, taking into account damage marked on that creature and other damage being dealt to it at the same time as this damage. Any damage greater than 1 is excess damage if the source dealing that damage has deathtouch.
120.4a
First, damage is dealt, as modified by replacement and prevention effects that interact with damage. (See rule 614, “Replacement Effects,” and rule 615, “Prevention Effects.”) Abilities that trigger when damage is dealt trigger now and wait to be put on the stack.
120.4b
Second, damage is dealt, as modified by replacement and prevention effects that interact with damage. (See rule 614, “Replacement Effects,” and rule 615, “Prevention Effects.”) Abilities that trigger when damage is dealt trigger now and wait to be put on the stack.
120.4b
Next, damage that’s been dealt is processed into its results, as modified by replacement effects that interact with those results (such as life loss or counters).
120.4c
Third, damage that’s been dealt is processed into its results, as modified by replacement effects that interact with those results (such as life loss or counters).
122.1b
A keyword counter on a permanent or on a card in a zone other than the battlefield causes that object to gain that keyword. The keywords that a keyword counter can be are flying, first strike, double strike, deathtouch, haste, hexproof, indestructible, lifelink, menace, reach, trample, and vigilance, as well as any variants of those keywords. See rule 613.1f.
122.8
If a triggered ability instructs a player to “put those counters” or to “put [an object’s] counters” on another object and that ability’s trigger condition or effect checks that the object with those counters left the battlefield, that player puts a number of counters on the second object of each kind the first object had before it left the battlefield. The player doesn’t move counters from one object to another.
201.5
Some promotional versions of Ikoria™: Lair of Behemoths cards feature a name other than their own in the upper left corner, with their normal name in a secondary title bar below it. These cards have only the card name specified in the secondary title bar, not the name printed where a card’s name would normally appear.
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
No planeswalker types were removed in this update.
205.3j
Planeswalkers have their own unique set of subtypes; these subtypes are called planeswalker types.
The new planeswalker types this set are: Lukka
(Click the rule number to see the full list of planeswalker types.)
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
No creature types were removed in this update.
205.3m
Creatures and tribals share their lists of subtypes; these subtypes are called creature types.
The new creature types this set are: Otter, Shark
(Click the rule number to see the full list of creature types.)
305.6
The basic land types are Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest. If an object uses the words “basic land type,” it’s referring to one of these subtypes. A land with a basic land type has the intrinsic ability “{T}: Add [mana symbol],” even if the text box doesn’t actually contain that text or the object has no text box. For Plains, [mana symbol] is {W}; for Islands, {U}; for Swamps, {B}; for Mountains, {R}; and for Forests, {G}. See rule 107.4a. See also rule 605, “Mana Abilities.”
305.6
The basic land types are Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest. If an object uses the words “basic land type,” it’s referring to one of these subtypes. An object with the land card type and a basic land type has the intrinsic ability “{T}: Add [mana symbol],” even if the text box doesn’t actually contain that text or the object has no text box. For Plains, [mana symbol] is {W}; for Islands, {U}; for Swamps, {B}; for Mountains, {R}; and for Forests, {G}. See rule 107.4a. See also rule 605, “Mana Abilities.”
400.10
If an object in the command zone is put into the command zone, it doesn’t change zones, but it becomes a new object that has just entered the command zone.
706.7a
If an ability causes a player to “choose a [value]” and a second, linked ability refers to that choice, the second ability is the only ability that can refer to that choice. An object doesn’t “remember” that choice and use it for other abilities it may copy later. If an object copies an ability that refers to a choice, but either (a) doesn’t copy that ability’s linked ability or (b) does copy the linked ability but no choice is made for it, then the choice is considered to be “undefined.” If an ability refers to an undefined choice, that part of the ability won’t do anything.
607.5a
If an object gains an ability that refers to a choice, but either (a) doesn’t copy that ability’s linked ability or (b) does copy the linked ability but no choice is made for it, then the choice is considered to be “undefined.” If an ability refers to an undefined choice, that part of the ability won’t do anything.
608.3
If the object that’s resolving is a permanent spell, its resolution involves a single step (unless it’s an Aura). The spell card becomes a permanent and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller.
608.3
If the object that’s resolving is a permanent spell, its resolution involves a single step (unless it’s an Aura or a mutating creature spell). The spell card becomes a permanent and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller.
608.3b
If the object that’s resolving is a mutating creature spell, its resolution involves two steps. First, it checks whether the target creature with the same owner as the spell is still legal. If so, the spell card merges with that permanent. Otherwise, it becomes a creature spell and is put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller. (See rule 702.139, “Mutate.”)
613.1a
Layer 1: Copy effects are applied. See rule 706, “Copying Objects.”
613.1a
Layer 1: Rules and effects that modify copiable values are applied.
613.1f
Layer 6: Ability–adding effects, ability–removing effects, and effects that say an object can’t have an ability are applied.
613.1f
Layer 6: Ability–adding effects, keyword counters, ability–removing effects, and effects that say an object can’t have an ability are applied.
613.2
Within layer 1, apply effects in a series of sublayers in the order described below. Within each sublayer, apply effects in timestamp order (see rule 613.7). Note that dependency may alter the order in which effects are applied within a sublayer. (See rule 613.8.)
613.2a
Layer 1a: Copiable effects are applied. This includes copy effects (see rule 706, “Copying Objects”) and changes to an object’s base characteristics determined by merging an object with a permanent (see rule 721, “Merging with Permanents”).
613.2b
Layer 1b: Face–down spells and permanents have their characteristics modified as defined in rule 707.2.
613.2c
After all rules and effects in layer 1 have been applied, the object’s characteristics are its copiable values. (See rule 706.2.)
613.2
Within layers 1–6, apply effects from characteristic–defining abilities first (see rule 604.3), then all other effects in timestamp order (see rule 613.6). Note that dependency may alter the order in which effects are applied within a layer. (See rule 613.7.)
613.3
Within layers 2–6, apply effects from characteristic–defining abilities first (see rule 604.3), then all other effects in timestamp order (see rule 613.7). Note that dependency may alter the order in which effects are applied within a layer. (See rule 613.8.)
613.3d
Layer 7d: Power and/or toughness changes from counters are applied. See rule 122, “Counters.”
613.4a
Layer 7a: Effects from characteristic–defining abilities that define power and/or toughness are applied. See rule 604.3.
613.3c
Layer 7c: Effects that modify power and/or toughness (but don’t set power and/or toughness to a specific number or value) are applied.
613.4c
Layer 7c: Effects and counters that modify power and/or toughness (but don’t set power and/or toughness to a specific number or value) are applied.
613.3e
Layer 7e: Effects that switch a creature’s power and toughness are applied. Such effects take the value of power and apply it to the creature’s toughness, and take the value of toughness and apply it to the creature’s power.
613.4d
Layer 7d: Effects that switch a creature’s power and toughness are applied. Such effects take the value of power and apply it to the creature’s toughness, and take the value of toughness and apply it to the creature’s power.
613.7c
Each counter receives a timestamp as it’s put on an object or player. If that object or player already has a counter of that kind on it, each counter of that kind receives a new timestamp identical to that of the new counter.
613.6d
An Aura, Equipment, or Fortification receives a new timestamp at the time it becomes attached to an object or player.
613.7e
An Aura, Equipment, or Fortification receives a new timestamp each time it becomes attached to an object or player.
613.6e
A permanent receives a new timestamp at the time it turns face up or face down.
613.7f
A permanent receives a new timestamp each time it turns face up or face down.
613.6f
A double–faced permanent receives a new timestamp at the time it transforms.
613.7g
A double–faced permanent receives a new timestamp each it transforms.
613.6j
If two or more objects would receive a timestamp simultaneously, such as by entering a zone simultaneously or becoming attached simultaneously, the active player determines their relative timestamp order at that time.
613.7k
If two or more objects would receive a timestamp simultaneously, such as by entering a zone simultaneously or becoming attached simultaneously, their relative timestamps are determined in APNAP order (see rule 101.4). Objects controlled by the active player (or owned by the active player, if they have no controller) have an earlier relative timestamp in the order of that player’s choice, followed by each other player in turn order.
613.7a
An effect is said to “depend on” another if (a) it’s applied in the same layer (and, if applicable, sublayer) as the other effect (see rules 613.1 and 613.3); (b) applying the other would change the text or the existence of the first effect, what it applies to, or what it does to any of the things it applies to; and (c) neither effect is from a characteristic–defining ability or both effects are from characteristic–defining abilities. Otherwise, the effect is considered to be independent of the other effect.
613.8a
An effect is said to “depend on” another if (a) it’s applied in the same layer (and, if applicable, sublayer) as the other effect; (b) applying the other would change the text or the existence of the first effect, what it applies to, or what it does to any of the things it applies to; and (c) neither effect is from a characteristic–defining ability or both effects are from characteristic–defining abilities. Otherwise, the effect is considered to be independent of the other effect.
614.5
A replacement effect doesn’t invoke itself repeatedly; it gets only one opportunity to affect an event or any modified events that may replace it.
614.5
A replacement effect doesn’t invoke itself repeatedly; it gets only one opportunity to affect an event or any modified events that may replace that event.
702.1c
An effect may state that “the same is true for” a list of keyword abilities. If one of those keyword abilities has variants or variables and the effect grants that keyword to one or more objects and/or players, it grants each appropriate variant and variable of that keyword.
702.1c
An effect may state that “the same is true for” a list of keyword abilities or similar. If one of those keyword abilities has variants or variables and the effect grants that keyword or counters of that keyword to one or more objects and/or players, it grants each appropriate variant and variable of that keyword.
702.19b
The controller of an attacking creature with trample first assigns damage to the creature(s) blocking it. Once all those blocking creatures are assigned lethal damage, any remaining damage is assigned as its controller chooses among those blocking creatures and the player or planeswalker the creature is attacking. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that’s being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that’s actually dealt. The attacking creature’s controller need not assign lethal damage to all those blocking creatures but in that case can’t assign any damage to the player or planeswalker it’s attacking.
702.19b
The controller of an attacking creature with trample first assigns damage to the creature(s) blocking it. Once all those blocking creatures are assigned lethal damage, any excess damage is assigned as its controller chooses among those blocking creatures and the player or planeswalker the creature is attacking. When checking for assigned lethal damage, take into account damage already marked on the creature and damage from other creatures that’s being assigned during the same combat damage step, but not any abilities or effects that might change the amount of damage that’s actually dealt. The attacking creature’s controller need not assign lethal damage to all those blocking creatures but in that case can’t assign any damage to the player or planeswalker it’s attacking.
702.123d
Except for determining the color identity of your commander, the two commanders function independently. When casting a commander with partner, ignore how many times your other commander has been cast. When determining whether a player has been dealt 21 or more combat damage by the same commander, consider damage from each of your two commanders separately. See rule 903.11a.
702.123d
Except for determining the color identity of your commander, the two commanders function independently. When casting a commander with partner, ignore how many times your other commander has been cast (see rule 903.6). When determining whether a player has been dealt 21 or more combat damage by the same commander, consider damage from each of your two commanders separately (see rule 903.10a).
702.138a
Companion is a keyword ability that functions outside the game. It’s written as “Companion—[Condition].” Before the game begins, you may reveal one card you own from outside the game with a companion ability whose condition is fulfilled by your starting deck. (See rule 103.1b.) If you do, once during that game, you may play that card from outside the game.
702.138b
If a companion ability refers to your starting deck, it refers to your deck after you’ve set aside any sideboard cards. In a Commander game, this is also before you’ve set aside your commander.
702.138c
Once you play the card with companion, it remains in the game until the game ends.
702.139a
Mutate appears on some creature cards. It represents a static ability that functions while the spell with mutate is on the stack. “Mutate [cost]” means “You may pay [cost] rather than pay this spell’s mana cost. If you do, it becomes a mutating creature spell and targets a non–Human creature with the same owner as this spell.” Casting a spell using its mutate ability follows the rules for paying alternative costs (see 601.2b and 601.2f–h).
702.139b
As a mutating creature spell begins resolving, if its target is illegal, it ceases to be a mutating creature spell and continues resolving as a creature spell and will be put onto the battlefield under the control of the spell’s controller.
702.139c
As a mutating creature spell resolves, if its target is legal, it doesn’t enter the battlefield. Rather, it merges with the target creature and becomes one object represented by more than one card or token (see rule 721, “Merging with Permanents”). The spell’s controller chooses whether the spell is put on top of the creature or on the bottom. The resulting permanent is a mutated permanent.
702.139d
An ability that triggers whenever a creature mutates triggers when a spell merges with a creature as a result of a resolving mutating creature spell.
702.139e
A mutated permanent has all abilities of each card and token that represents it. Its other characteristics are derived from the topmost card or token.
702.139f
Any effect that refers to or modifies the mutating creature spell refers to or modifies the mutated permanent it merges with as it resolves.
704.5g
If a creature has toughness greater than 0, and the total damage marked on it is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed. Regeneration can replace this event.
704.5g
If a creature has toughness greater than 0, it has damage marked on it, and the total damage marked on it is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed. Regeneration can replace this event.
706.2
When copying an object, the copy acquires the copiable values of the original object’s characteristics and, for an object on the stack, choices made when casting or activating it (mode, targets, the value of X, whether it was kicked, how it will affect multiple targets, and so on). The “copiable values” are the values derived from the text printed on the object (that text being name, mana cost, color indicator, card type, subtype, supertype, rules text, power, toughness, and/or loyalty), as modified by other copy effects, by its face–down status, and by “as . . . enters the battlefield” and “as . . . is turned face up” abilities that set power and toughness (and may also set additional characteristics). Other effects (including type–changing and text–changing effects), status, and counters are not copied.
706.2
When copying an object, the copy acquires the copiable values of the original object’s characteristics and, for an object on the stack, choices made when casting or activating it (mode, targets, the value of X, whether it was kicked, how it will affect multiple targets, and so on). The copiable values are the values derived from the text printed on the object (that text being name, mana cost, color indicator, card type, subtype, supertype, rules text, power, toughness, and/or loyalty), as modified by other copy effects, by its face–down status, and by “as . . . enters the battlefield” and “as . . . is turned face up” abilities that set power and toughness (and may also set additional characteristics). Other effects (including type–changing and text–changing effects), status, and counters are not copied.
708.4b
The mana cost of a split card is the combined mana costs of its two halves. A split card’s colors and converted mana cost are determined from its combined mana cost.
708.4b
The mana cost of a split card is the combined mana costs of its two halves. A split card’s colors and converted mana cost are determined from its combined mana cost. An effect that refers specifically to the symbols in a split card’s mana cost sees the separate symbols rather than the whole mana cost.
721.1
One keyword causes an object to merge with a permanent. See rule 702.139, “Mutate.”
721.2
To merge an object with a permanent, place that object on top of or under that permanent. That permanent becomes a merged permanent represented by the card that represented that object in addition to any other components that were representing it.
721.2a
A merged permanent has only the characteristics of its topmost component, unless otherwise specified by the effect that caused them to merge. This is a copiable effect whose timestamp is the time the objects merged. (See rule 613.2.)
721.2b
As an object merges with a permanent, that object leaves its previous zone and becomes part of an object on the battlefield, but the resulting permanent isn’t considered to have just entered the battlefield.
721.2c
Because a merged permanent is the same object that it was before, it hasn’t just come under a player’s control, any continuous effects that affected it continue to do so, and so on.
721.2d
If a merged permanent contains a token, the resulting permanent is a token only if the topmost component is a token.
721.2e
If a merged permanent contains face–up and face–down components, the permanent’s status is determined by its topmost component. If a face–down permanent becomes a face–up permanent as a result of an object merging with it, other effects don’t count it as being turned face up.
721.2f
If a merged permanent is turned face down, each face–up component that represents it is turned face down. If a face–down merged permanent is turned face up, each face–down component that represents it is turned face up.
721.2g
A face–down merged permanent that contains an instant or sorcery card can’t be turned face up. If such a permanent would turn face up, its controller reveals it and leaves it face down. Abilities that trigger when a permanent is turned face up won’t trigger.
721.2h
If a merged permanent contains a flip card (see rule 709), that component’s alternative characteristics are used instead of its normal characteristics if the merged permanent is flipped.
721.2i
If a merged permanent contains one or more double–faced cards (see rule 711), transforming that permanent causes each of those double–faced cards to turn so that its other face is up.
721.2j
A face–up merged permanent that contains a double–faced card or meld card can’t be turned face down.
721.3
If a merged permanent leaves the battlefield, one permanent leaves the battlefield and each of the individual components are put into the appropriate zone.
721.3a
If a merged permanent is put into its owner’s graveyard or library, that player may arrange the new objects in any order. If it’s put into its owner’s library, that player doesn’t reveal the order.
721.3b
If a player exiles a merged permanent, that player determines the relative timestamp order of the cards at that time. This is an exception to the procedure described in rule 613.7k.
721.3c
If an effect can find the new object that a merged permanent becomes as it leaves the battlefield, it finds all of those objects. (See rule 400.7.) If that effect causes actions to be taken upon those objects, the same actions are taken upon each of them.
721.3d
If multiple replacement effects could be applied to the event of a merged permanent leaving the battlefield or being put into the new zone, applying one of those replacement effects to one of the objects affects all of the objects. If the merged permanent is a commander, it may be exempt from this rule; see rule 903.9a.
903.3c
If a player’s commander is a component of a merged permanent, the resulting merged permanent is that player’s commander.
903.5a
Each deck must contain exactly 100 cards, including its commander.
903.5a
Each deck must contain exactly 100 cards, including its commander. In other words, the minimum deck size and the maximum deck size are both 100.
903.9a
If a commander is a melded permanent and its owner chooses to put it into the command zone this way, that permanent and the card representing it that isn’t a commander are put into the appropriate zone, and the card that represents it and is a commander is put into the command zone.
903.9a
If a commander is a melded permanent or a merged permanent and its owner chooses to put it into the command zone this way, that permanent and each component representing it that isn’t a commander are put into the appropriate zone, and the card that represents it and is a commander is put into the command zone.
903.11
If a player is allowed to bring a card from outside the game into a Commander game, that player can’t bring a card into the game this way if it has the same name as a card that player had in their starting deck, if it has the same name as a card that the player has already brought into the game, or if any color in its color identity isn’t in the color identity of the player’s commander.
903.11d
A player’s deck must contain exactly 60 cards, including its commander.
903.12d
A player’s deck must contain exactly 60 cards, including its commander. In other words, the minimum deck size and the maximum deck size are both 60.